Tuesday, July 31, 2012

PB Inspired Console Table

Pottery Barn Inspired Console Table


I made this console table a few months ago and am finally getting around to posting how I made it. 

Pottery Barn's Consoles:

Sawyer Console Table
799.00
Keaton Console Table 
$799.00



Initially, I wanted to build a long skinny table for the my hallway upstairs that connects my daughters room and the guest room. I built this table custom to fit in that space. Once I was finished with the table, I loved it so much, it did not even make it upstairs. I created a display right in my living room. I guess the upstairs hallway console will have to be another project for another day. 

The plan for the table was to have four legs, a pretty top, and 4 "false drawer" panels on the face of the table. I did not use a particular pattern for this table, I just used the knowledge of how I made the Farmhouse Side Table  and extended it some and changed the sides. Ok, I guess it is almost nothing like the side table, but you can see the construction inspiration, right? Also, I used some inspiration from Ana-White.com and her fantastic building website for the Balin Console Table  plan. 

Actual final Console measurements:

57" length  x 17" wide x 33 1/2 inches tall.

Here's how I built the Console:

First,  I took a series of 2x2 scraps 11.5 inches long, stacked them and glued them together with gorilla glue. Then I added two 2x2's at 32 inches long to the ends of the stacks, I gorilla glued them then added 2 inch countersunk screws at each end, four on each side. 

I built two of these. These are the ends of the console table. 

FYI-You could also use a wider piece of wood as the end plates, for example a 1x8 or 2 1x4's etc. Use any scraps you may have, you just need enough for the width of two ends. 

Build two end pieces for the table. 

Then, I had to join the two legs together. I laid the end pieces on their sides and added one length of 2x2 at 50 inches to join the pieces, this has now become the front of the table bottom support. I used gorilla glue and screwed the 2x2 ends to the legs. 



Then, I added two short stubby 2x2's on top of the bottom joint. This will help give the false drawer fronts some stability and look more "built in". 

"Stubby" 2x2's are seen here on the left and right sides of the table. I attached them through the underside of the 2x2 long joint. 


Front of table is on the floor.


Then I stood the table up to make sure it was all level. 



Now was time to work on the"false drawers". See my tutorial on how to create false cuts

I used two small boards I bought at ikea in the clearance room 10 pieces for one dollar (!). I knew I would have to sand the finish off of them but they would be perfect as the false drawer fronts. So much easier than having to build drawers...very tedious.

FYI: Once the false drawers are stained, the inside grooves of the false cuts collect more stain making them appear deeper, creating the appearance of a real drawer. 

Then, I added one more stubby 2x2 in between both false drawer panels. 

Attaching false panels to front of console using glue and finishing nails. 
Then I added the back supports:


The above picture actually shows the front after the back was assembled. For the back,  I added one 2x2 at 50 inches to the bottom of the back panel, as well as a scrap board 3 1/2 inches wide cut to 50 inches (the length) of the back. 

For the bottom of the console, I added 4 2x2's to the legs for extra support, then across for the support and shelf I was going to add later. 

Bottom supports.
For the bottom shelf:




Bottom shelf assembly:
This was all made of scrap wood. 

FYI-

One thing I have learned about building shelves for the bottom of tables: 

1) You can mix and match the wood because it will all be stained the same color and...

2) The shelf will be filled with lots of nicknacks so it doesn't matter what the seams etc. look like.

I cut two heavy plywood scraps and attached them to the 2x2 supports. Then I used scrap 1x2's that had been cut at odd lengths and puzzle pieced them together and filled in the cracks with wood filler in order to create a "border" around the shelf. 

Next comes the top:

For the top I used yet another one of my floor planks (inherited from my sister-in-law after her wood floors were installed years ago) for the top. I love the way this wood looks, and its character... when stained especially!

I attached the top to the base with countersunk screws, gorilla glue and finishing nails. 

After attaching the top I filled in all holes with wood filler, and sanded, sanded, sanded with my orbital sander. Then vacuumed the table to get rid of sawdust, and wiped clean with a wet towel. 

I used the stain I had leftover from my Farmhouse table . See that post for stain mixture formula. I apply my stains using a rag, and go with the grain. I swipe over the stain with a cleaner part of the rag in order to smooth out any dark/thick areas where the stain has collected. 


Closeup of character of wood- I love it!

After the entire table was stained, I added 3 coats of poly-acrylic in clear satin, allowing to dry after each coat. 

Then, I added the hardware to the false drawers. I found 4 of these cabinet pulls in my basement in an "extras" box kept after my house was built - they were extra kitchen cabinet pulls. Score!

Cabinet pulls.
Now, I moved the console inside of the house, but it did not make it past the living room. I placed it under a mirror in the living room, this area needed something, don't you think??


And...its toddler friendly!

Top of console.




Console with vignette. 
Hope you enjoyed this post of the Pottery Barn Inspired Console Table. Drop me a line with any comments/ compliments. 

Thanks! 
Kristen 


6 comments:

  1. Love this table...it is an improvement over what Pottery Barn offered.

    ReplyDelete
  2. This table is absolutely gorgeous! I cannot believe you built this and that it looks 1000x better then Pottery Barn's look-alike. I love Pottery Barn but I think I love you more now =]

    ReplyDelete
  3. Your table is gorgeous and if I didn't know where either came from, I would choose yours any day. You did a fantastic job! Do you think I could talk you into making one for me? : )

    ReplyDelete
  4. Your table is by far my favorite!! Awesome instructions for the build too!! Congratulations!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Great job! First time reader of your blog...I am checking out other posts now!

    ReplyDelete